Relocate.World logo

Portugal

Moving to Portugal

The Golden Coast of Europe has a name that embodies it all. Infused by sea, Portugal’s majestic coastline is an honest reflection of her inner-beauty. From timeless cobblestoned villages nestled within rolling vineyards to snow-capped peaks and a world-class capital city, Lisboa, it is hard to imagine a more welcoming destination and place to live. Historically known for financing the most far-reaching, royal seafaring expeditions that have influenced our world, it’s no wonder why so many have returned home to their port.

Portugal is a country located on the western coast of the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost sovereign state of mainland Europe, as well as the oldest nation state in Europe. Portugal has a rich history and culture, with influences from various civilizations that have passed through the country over the centuries, including the Celts, Romans, and Moors. Portugal is known for its beautiful beaches, delicious cuisine, and vibrant music and art scenes. The country is also home to a number of UNESCO World Heritage sites, including the historic center of Porto and the University of Coimbra. Overall, Portugal is a friendly and welcoming country with a lot to offer visitors.

Living in Portugal

Living in Portugal as an expat can be a rewarding and enjoyable experience. Portugal is known for its laid-back and relaxed way of life, which can be attractive to those coming from more fast-paced environments. The country has a relatively low cost of living compared to other European countries, and the climate is generally warm and sunny, with mild winters and hot summers.

One potential challenge of living in Portugal as an expat is that the country has a relatively high unemployment rate, which can make it difficult to find work. Additionally, the Portuguese language can be difficult for non-native speakers to learn, which can make it challenging to communicate with locals and navigate daily life in the country. However, there is a growing expat community in Portugal, and many expats report feeling welcome and integrated into local society.

Top-Places in Portugal to Live

There are many great places to live in Portugal, and the best place for you will depend on your personal preferences and needs. Some popular cities and towns for expats in Portugal include:

Lisbon - the capital and largest city of Portugal, known for its historic neighborhoods, vibrant nightlife, and beautiful beaches Porto - the second-largest city in Portugal, known for its charming historic center and delicious wine Algarve - a region in the south of Portugal known for its beautiful beaches, golf courses, and Mediterranean climate Coimbra - a city in central Portugal known for its historic university and rich cultural history Cascais - a coastal town near Lisbon known for its sandy beaches, upscale restaurants and shops, and charming old town.

Other factors to consider when choosing a place to live in Portugal include proximity to amenities, cost of living, and access to healthcare and education.

Do I need a visa for Portugal?

Whether or not you need a visa to enter Portugal will depend on your nationality and the purpose and duration of your stay.

Citizens of European Union (EU) countries and a number of other countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, do not need a visa to enter Portugal for stays of up to 90 days. If you wish to stay in Portugal for longer than 90 days, you will need to apply for a residence permit.

Citizens of countries outside of the EU and the list of visa-exempt countries may need to apply for a visa in order to enter Portugal. There are several types of visas available for different purposes, including tourist visas, business visas, and student visas.

It is recommended that you check the requirements for your specific situation on the website of the Portuguese consulate or embassy in your country. It is also a good idea to check the expiration date on your passport to make sure it is valid for at least six months beyond the end of your intended stay in Portugal.

Visa and Immigration Options for Portugal

There are several types of visas available for different purposes and durations of stay in Portugal. Here are some of the main types of visas:

Tourist visa - allows you to stay in Portugal for up to 90 days for the purpose of tourism or visiting friends and family.

Business visa - allows you to stay in Portugal for up to 90 days for business-related activities, such as attending meetings, conferences, or negotiations.

Student visa - allows you to stay in Portugal to study at a Portuguese educational institution.

Residence permit - allows you to stay in Portugal for longer than 90 days for the purpose of work, study, family reunification, or other reasons.

Which visa you need will depend on your specific situation and the purpose and duration of your stay in Portugal.

Working in Portugal

If you want to live and work in Portugal, you will need to apply for a residence permit. There are several types of residence permits available for different purposes, including work, study, and family reunification.

To apply for a residence permit for work purposes, you will need to have a job offer from a Portuguese employer. Your employer will typically start the application process by submitting a request to the immigration authorities on your behalf. Once the request is approved, you will need to apply for a residence permit at the Portuguese embassy or consulate in your country.

To apply for a residence permit, you will need to provide a number of documents, including a valid passport, proof of sufficient financial means to support yourself during your stay in Portugal, and a clean criminal record certificate. You may also be required to undergo a medical examination.

It is important to note that obtaining a residence permit does not automatically grant you the right to work in Portugal. You will also need to apply for a work permit, which your employer can help you with.

What is the D7 Visa?

The D7 visa is a type of residence permit that allows you to stay in Portugal for the purpose of carrying out specified work. It is issued for a maximum of one year and can be renewed for additional periods of up to two years. Previous to the release of the Digital Nomad visa, the D7 was the most common pathway for remote workers and digital nomads in Portugal.

To be eligible for a D7 visa, you must generally meet the following requirements:

  • Hold a degree from a recognized higher education institution
  • Have sufficient financial means to support yourself during your stay in Portugal
  • Have a clean criminal record
  • Have medical insurance

You will need to apply for a D7 visa at the Portuguese embassy or consulate in your country. You will need to provide a number of documents, including a valid passport, proof of your degree and research experience, and a letter of invitation from your employer. You may also be required to undergo a medical examination.

Remote Work in Portugal

Portugal can be a good place for remote workers, as it has a relatively low cost of living, a mild climate, and a good quality of life. The country has a growing digital nomad community and has taken steps to attract remote workers, including formally launching the "Digital Nomad Visa" in late-2022.

There are a number of factors to consider when deciding whether Portugal is a good place for you as a remote worker. Some potential advantages include:

Good value for money: While this is changing rapidly, Portugal has a relatively low cost of living compared to Western and developed countries, especially in terms of housing and food.

High-speed internet: Portugal has good internet infrastructure, with high-speed broadband available in most areas.

Co-working spaces: There are a number of co-working spaces and shared offices available in Portuguese cities, which can be a convenient and cost-effective option for remote workers.

Quality of life: Portugal has a good quality of life, with a relaxed pace of life and a rich cultural heritage.

However, it is worth noting that the Portuguese language can be difficult for non-native speakers to learn, which can make it challenging to communicate with locals and navigate daily life in the country. Additionally, the country has a relatively high unemployment rate, which can make it difficult to find work (if you are looking).

Dig-deeper into FAQs, featured articles about relocating to Portugal and connect with leading Advisors in Portugal today.

Featured Advisors

Connect with leading experts in Portugal

Find the perfect Advisor based on your relocation needs.

or

See The Complete List

Featured Articles ✈ Portugal

Get Inspired. Stay Informed.

We provide our readers with original, practical and high-quality information about relocation....written by the experts.

Let's go places together Subscribe to our Newsletter

Join our community of Global Citizens today.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

AboutRelocate.Series Terms & ConditionsPrivacy policyContactReferral ProgramCitizen Remote 🏄