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Germany

Moving to Germany

The second most populous country in Europe, Germany needs little introduction. Deutschland as its natives call it, invites Auslanders (or foreigners) with open arms, full kegs of beer and over 1000 different kinds of sausages. Did you know that Germans are the second largest beer consumers in the world? Germany’s contribution to the world goes beyond its scientific discoveries – we have the Germans to thank for some essential everyday inventions – including coffee filters, adhesive tape, electric drills, taxi meters and the Christmas tree.

The Engine of the European Union Rolls on all Cylinders

Germany, boasting the largest economy in the EU put into effect progressive immigration regimes over the last decade to maintain its economic engine. This included its Skilled Worker Immigration Act at the dawn of 2020. Thanks to a shrinking labor force, the country is once again tasked with supplanting its working population that is predicted to fall by 6 million by 2035, and hence primed for skilled talent to occupy vacancies. For remote workers and digital nomads that are considering Germany as a home base, this can be a very opportune time.

Berlin Consistently Attracts World Class Talent in the Tech-Space

Needless to say, Europe’s industrial powerhouse, Germany, is fast becoming the region’s startup hub too. Berlin was ranked not only Germany’s but Europe’s top city for startups with investors pouring in over five billion euros into Berlin startups in 2021 alone.

With the country’s focus on digitalisation and the future of work with programs like Industry 4.0 and Digital Strategy 2025, Germany is on track to attract the talent it needs and vies for.

Top Places to live in Germany

Germany is a country with a high standard of living and a diverse range of cities and regions to choose from. Some of the most popular places to live in Germany include:

Berlin: The capital of Germany, Berlin is known for its vibrant culture, history, and nightlife. It is also home to a large expat community and has a relatively low cost of living compared to other German cities.

Munich: Located in the south of Germany, Munich is the capital of the state of Bavaria and is known for its high quality of life and strong economy. It is also home to many international corporations and is a popular destination for tourists.

Hamburg: Located in the north of Germany, Hamburg is the second-largest city in the country and is known for its port, cultural attractions, and vibrant nightlife. It is also home to a large expat community and has a strong economy.

Frankfurt: Located in the central part of Germany, Frankfurt is a major financial center and is home to the European Central Bank and the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. It is also a hub for international business and has a high standard of living.

Stuttgart: Located in the south of Germany, Stuttgart is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg and is known for its high quality of life and strong economy. It is home to many international corporations and is a popular destination for tourists.

Ultimately, the best place to live in Germany will depend on your personal preferences and needs. It is a good idea to research and compare different cities and regions before making a decision.

Immigration and Visa Options for Germany

There are several types of visas that you can apply for to visit or live in Germany, depending on the purpose of your stay. Some common types of visas include:

Tourist visa: This type of visa is for individuals who want to visit Germany for tourism or other short-term purposes, such as sightseeing, visiting friends or relatives, or participating in cultural, sports, or other activities. Tourist visas are generally valid for stays of up to 90 days.

Business visa: This type of visa is for individuals who want to visit Germany for business purposes, such as attending business meetings, conferences, or trade fairs. Business visas are generally valid for stays of up to 90 days.

Employment visa: This type of visa is for individuals who have been offered a job in Germany and will be working there for an extended period of time. Employment visas are generally valid for the duration of the employment contract.

Study visa: This type of visa is for individuals who want to study in Germany for a period of time that exceeds 90 days. Study visas are generally valid for the duration of the study program.

Family reunification visa: This type of visa is for individuals who are married to or are the close relative of a German citizen or a person with a valid residence permit in Germany and want to join them in the country.

To apply for a visa for Germany, you will need to complete the appropriate application form and submit it, along with any required documents and the applicable fee, to the German embassy or consulate in your country. The processing time for visa applications can vary, so it is important to apply well in advance of your intended travel date.

Dig deeper into our FAQs, on-the-pulse information about Germany and connect with leading corporate, tax, and immigration Advisors in Germany today.

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